Differences between grounded theory and ethnographic research

Grounded theory, developed by Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss, is a methodology that involves developing theory through the analysis of data. Ethnography is the systematic study of a culture or community.

Differences between grounded theory and ethnographic research

Posted on March 25, by misterelizabeth A foreshadowing research problem pertaining to my area of interest could be: The differences between phenomenological and ethnographic research are numerous.

Phenomenological research seeks to understand the subjective, lived experiences and perspectives of participants.

Differences between grounded theory and ethnographic research

This kind of research is individualistic and provides the researcher with information regarding a persons unique experience. Ethnographic research focuses more on the collectivistic experiences within a certain culture.

This research is often conducted by observing a group of people for an extended period of time, documenting and interpreting their procession.

Goals of researchers while selecting a methodology

My research seeks to understand the personal experiences and subsequent decision making processes specific to African American lesbians. In order to understand this phenomena, I will have to conduct individual interviews in an effort to best understand their personal journeys.

Phenomenological research would best suit my area of interest because I want to know the individual factors that contribute towards a persons decision to come out, even though all participants share the commonalities of being African American, female and a lesbian.

Ethnography — Through observing a population within a culture for a long time, sometimes years, researchers seek to understand shared, common experiences specific to a group of people.

Phenomenological — This research is based on the idea that there are multiple ways to interpret the same experience. How a person perceives things to be, regardless of how skewed their perceptions may be, that is their reality.

Ethnography — There are two kinds of problems promulgated by ethnographic research. The first, foreshadowed problems, provide a general framework to begin research and are usually what?

Main Difference – Grounded Theory vs Ethnography

The problem should indicate who will be participating in this study, and in what setting. Secondly, specific questions arise from the relationship between the problem and the data — this speaks to emergent design, which suggests that a change in the question garners a change in the research design.

Phenomenological — The research design creates questions that focus on the meaning of a persons experiences, and the researchers role in understanding them. These kinds of questions are often fluid, and susceptible to change. They focus on more descriptive components of research, and like ethnographic questions, do not reflect researcher bias hopefully.

They should also provide a clear indication of who participants are and in what context. Ethnographic — Participants are chosen using purposeful sampling strategies because of their extensive knowledge regarding a certain topic.

Participants can be gathered through maximum variation having participants of both extremessnowballing initial participants provide referrals for other possible candidatessampling by case extreme, typical, unique, reputationutilizing the knowledge of a key informant who is particularly privy to your topic, and comprehensive selection — which is taking anyone who is relevant.

Phenomenological — Since this method seeks to understand a persons lived experiences, participants are chosen because they have lived, or are currently living the experience you are researching. It is crucial that participants be willing to share their experiences, and be able to discuss them in a purposeful way.

Ethnographic — Ethnographic research information is most commonly gathered through observation in which the researchers establishes a long term, continuous relationship with the participants. Diligently taking notes is vital to forming a comprehensive inference. Information gathered through field notes can either be descriptions of what occurred, or reflections of what descriptions mean.

Interviews are commonplace in ethnographic research, and provide the opportunity for participants to voice their opinions, and offer any necessary clarity. · Page - 1 Qualitative methodologies: ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory and more • To introduce some of the applications of qualitative methodologies to research questions the philosophical basis that underlies the qualitative methodology such as ethnography, phenomenology Grounded theory (as developed by Glaser, Strauss tranceformingnlp.com Differences between Grounded theory and Ethnography Firstly, as already discussed in the previous paragraphs, Ethnography differentiates itself from grounded theory because it entails to understand the participant behavior with respect to a specific culture.

The three types of qualitative research are phenomenological, grounded theory, and ethnographic research.

State the difference between an ethnographic research and a psychometric research and give example from applied linguistic studies.

2. Grounded theory, ethnography and phenomenology: A comparative analysis of three qualitative strategies for marketing tranceformingnlp.com Grounded theory and phenomenology are the most common approaches to qualitative research used by nurses.

Although there are differences between the two, they have much in common.

Interviewing in phenomenology and grounded theory: is there a difference? - PubMed - NCBI

Mar 25,  · The differences between phenomenological and ethnographic research are numerous. Phenomenological research seeks to understand the subjective, lived experiences and perspectives of participants.

This kind of research is individualistic and provides the researcher with information regarding a persons unique experience.

Differences and similarities in Grounded theory and Ethnography | Knowledge Tank