Julius caesar speeches antony and brutus

The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar.

Julius caesar speeches antony and brutus

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Notice that Brutus speaks with studied plainness of manner, disdaining oratorical tricks and presenting his case with fewest possible words.

He believes that his cause is plainly right and needs no defence. He tries to seem to have brought no passion to his deed as assassin.

Antony, on the contrary, uses all the tricks of a mob leader. He is overwhelmed with grief and apologizes for his emotion, which, however, he displays before the people with clever effect.

He evidently understands his audience better than does Brutus. It is still the ides of March, a few hours perhaps after Caesar's death. Up to this point the conspirators have carried everything before them, but in this scene the tide turns and the spirit of Caesar begins to work out its revenge.

And public reasons, etc.: And reasons for Caesar's death shall be publicly set forth. We should say "has ascended. This construction, common enough in Shakespeare's time, has already occurred in the play. Do you remember "Three parts of him is ours"? Where did Casca say, So every bondman in his own hand bears The power to cancel his captivity?

The question of his death, etc. That is, a statement of the reasons why Cassar was put to death is placed in the official records of the Capitol. Here just the opposite of extenuated, -- that is, enlarged, exaggerated.

According to Cassius, while Caesar lived, all Romans were "bondmen"; now that he is dead, Brutus believes that the commonwealth will be restored. Shakespeare often uses the nominative case of pronouns after prepositions where modern grammatical usage demands the objective.

Quick Answer

See "save only he" in V, 5, I am beholden, or under obligations to you. Notice the marked contrast between Antony's style and that of Brutus. The Romans burned their dead.

Shakespeare is speaking to an English audience and thinks of English manners and customs, as when he speaks of the coffin in below. In "The Merchant" Portia speaks of the treasury of Venice as "the privy coffer of the state.

Where did Brutus say, "Let no man abide suffer for this deed But we the doers"? Antony says there are now none so poor or humble but that Csesar is too low for their regard. I have o'ershot myself.Speeches of Mark Antony and Brutus in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar The play 'Julius Caesar' reaches a peak of tension at the point of the two speeches, and so it would seem whichever speech was enjoyed more by the crowd would make the speaker the more popular.

Julius Caesar Essay: Brutus's and Antony's Speeches - Brutus's and Antony's Speeches in Julius Caesar William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is a tragic story of the dog and the manger.

After Caesar is killed Mark Antony, a good friend of Caesar, plots to revenge his bloody death. Julius Caesar Please see the bottom of the page for full explanatory notes and helpful resources.

Julius caesar speeches antony and brutus

The speeches given by both Brutus and Mark Antony in William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Julius Caesar are very persuasive to the audience that they are given to, but rhetorical devices were used in different ways in order for each to have an effect on the people of Rome.

In Brutus’s speech, he uses devices [ ]. The Life and Death of Julius Caesar Shakespeare homepage | Julius Caesar | Act 3, Scene 2 Previous scene | Next scene. Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.

If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: O royal Caesar! ANTONY Hear me with patience. All Peace, ho! ANTONY. Speeches of Mark Antony and Brutus in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar The play 'Julius Caesar' reaches a peak of tension at the point of the two speeches, and so it would seem whichever speech was enjoyed more by the crowd would make the speaker the more popular.

SCENE II. The Forum.