Three aspects of irony in the play the crucible by arthur miller

Miller bases the play on the historical account of the Salem witch trials. In particular he focuses on the discovery of several young girls and a slave playing in the woods, conjuring — or attempting to conjure — spirits from the dead. Rather than suffer severe and inevitable punishment for their actions, the girls accused other inhabitants of Salem of practicing witchcraft.

Three aspects of irony in the play the crucible by arthur miller

All Puritans were expected to live by strict, uncompromising rules that kept their intentions good and their souls pure.

Three aspects of irony in the play the crucible by arthur miller

Gossiping, dancing, partaking in drinking alcohol, and committing adultery were examples of activities that the Puritans considered evil and acts of the Devil. Arthur Miller makes use of irony to develop the true characters of the Puritans residing in Salem in The The Puritan religion and beliefs were based on hard work, self-discipline, and religious duty.

Arthur Miller makes use of irony to develop the true characters of the Puritans residing in Salem in The Crucible. This irony is a direct reflection of how Miller felt about the Puritan religion and their actions, which he considered to be hypocritical.

There are three types of irony: Verbal irony is when a character speaking in literature says one thing, but actually means another.

Situational irony is when the outcome of a situation is opposite of what readers expect would happen. Dramatic irony is when the readers know something that a character in the literature does not. Elizabeth and John, both prominent Puritans in the Salem community, were caught in this unfortunate situation of lying and committing adultery, respectively.

Within the play, we see dramatic irony throughout as readers know the girls are lying and it is all pretense, yet the judges do not. More situational irony occurs when Proctor publicly admits his affair in the hope of defeating Abigail. As readers, we assume this is going to work and Abigail and her lies will be uncovered.

Irony in crucible | Essay Example

However, it ironically gets John in trouble instead. The irony in all of these situations is that so much corruption and dishonesty is occurring within a group of people whose lives are supposed to be based on honesty, religion and morality.

Miller saw the hypocrisy of this religion during his own time, and used the literary device to present his beliefs to his readers.The Crucible by Arthur Miller. Home / Literature / The Crucible / John Proctor, the protagonist of The Crucible, is in desperate need of forgiveness at the start of the play but his wife seems torn about whether to Good vs.

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Evil (Click the themes infographic to download.) The entire village bases its belief system on the conflict. Arthur Miller makes use of irony to develop the true characters of the Puritans residing in Salem in The Crucible.

This irony is a direct reflection of . 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller is a dramatic play about the Salem witch trials.

Three aspects of irony in the play the crucible by arthur miller

Miller uses several types of irony to express the degree of absurdity that is . Speakers: John Proctor and Reverend Hale Irony: Situational Explanation: When Hale asked Proctor to recite the 10 commandments, he literally forgot that adultery is a commandment, considering his affair with Abigail being a prime example of adultery and the fact that he forgot to recite it.

Each stage production of The Crucible differs from every other in two areas.

Similarities between McCarthyism and The Crucible

First, directors stage the play according to their own styles, using various props and costumes while suggesting numerous interpretations of characters. A summary of Act I: Opening scene to the entrance of John Proctor in Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Crucible and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

SparkNotes: The Crucible: Themes